Pro HDR iPhone App

September 23rd, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

My review for today is Pro HDR. There are a varying array of opinion when it comes to HDR among photographers, but for the most part, HDR is quickly becoming a tool that a lot of photographers are using.

I have been using Pro HDR for a while, and it was my go to app when I wanted to pull detail out of an image.

Photo

When you open the app, there will be a few options to choose from. Below you, at the top is grid on/off and the HDR Auto feature. The app allows you to create an image just after you have opened it.

At the bottom is a zoom slider, hide (removes grid and HDR Auto), and settings. The camera icon starts the HDR process the same as tapping the screen, and the settings gives you options to turn on/off different features or choose the format of your images.

Image

Let’s select the HDR Auto. As you can see below more options will appear. Included will be Manual, Off, and Library. I hardly ever use manual. I recommend trying it and using a tripod for stabilization. If your images do not line up, ghosting will appear in the image. Ghosting is the same as placing two transparencies on top of each other. You can see both images at the same time. People or moving objects will appear as if they had faded into or out of the image.

Off gives you an option to capture an image (as if you were in camera mode) without going through the HDR process.

The last option is the one I use the most. I will select images from my Library that I have already chosen for to be processed. Another application, called Dynamic Light, is what I use for creating those images, but that will be another blog entry.

0image

Loading photo library…

1image

Once the library is open, you can select your first image. It will prompt you to select the darkest, but you can try the lightest first for a different result also.

2image

Select the second image…

3image

As you can see below, the two images were not drastically different from each other. That is alright. Experiment with different images to find the perfect blend. HDR is subject to the photographers design. It can be drastic or subtle.

4image

After it has blended the two images, multiple sliders will appear. You can fine tune the image to your liking. Do not worry about making a mistake because you can always start the process over.

5image

Finally, after you find the right settings, hit save.

6image

My next review will be on the Dynamic Light App. If you want to see my images, you can follow me on Instagram and Twitter. Instagram is @josephferreira and Twitter is @ferreirajoseph.

Why You Should Not Throw Images Away

September 5th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

I started going through some of my old images from two of my first digital cameras and my 35mm film to upload to Instagram and Google+.

The first digital camera was a camera/webcam that had no view screen to see the images, but I was use to that with 35mm.

A few years later we were given a 4 mega pixel Kodak point and shoot camera which we used quite a bit. I have recently gone through and posted them on Instagram, and they look great!

Photo

We get so wrapped up in mega pixels and glass that we forget that there are great images that have been lost or put away because they came from ‘inferior cameras’.

The truth is that the camera cannot take great images by themselves, and photographers are not limited by their equipment as much as they think they are. The myth that better equipment makes better images will frustrate many people. The greatest photographers from history created works of art from inferior equipment by our standards.

I think there are many photographers who need to put down their DSLRs and pick up a 3 or 4 mega pixel camera. Are you up for the challenge? I am.

If you want to follow my journey with my iPhone and point & shoot images, you can follow me on Instagram or twitter.

Instagram: @josephferreira Twitter: @ferreirajoseph