Why You Should Not Throw Images Away

September 5th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

I started going through some of my old images from two of my first digital cameras and my 35mm film to upload to Instagram and Google+.

The first digital camera was a camera/webcam that had no view screen to see the images, but I was use to that with 35mm.

A few years later we were given a 4 mega pixel Kodak point and shoot camera which we used quite a bit. I have recently gone through and posted them on Instagram, and they look great!

Photo

We get so wrapped up in mega pixels and glass that we forget that there are great images that have been lost or put away because they came from ‘inferior cameras’.

The truth is that the camera cannot take great images by themselves, and photographers are not limited by their equipment as much as they think they are. The myth that better equipment makes better images will frustrate many people. The greatest photographers from history created works of art from inferior equipment by our standards.

I think there are many photographers who need to put down their DSLRs and pick up a 3 or 4 mega pixel camera. Are you up for the challenge? I am.

If you want to follow my journey with my iPhone and point & shoot images, you can follow me on Instagram or twitter.

Instagram: @josephferreira Twitter: @ferreirajoseph

Why I’m On Twitter…And Other Thoughts

August 8th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

For years I avoided Twitter, Facebook, and other social media sites. But first, let’s go back 12-15 years to when I avoided email, pagers, and cellphones.

When I was in high school, in the mid 90′s, pagers were very popular. Cellphones were in existence, but they were typically used by doctors and others who could afford that technology. Pagers were the cellular of the masses.

I remember everyone, my age, jumping onto the pager bandwagon, and I tried to avoid it. My parents forced me to carry one because I started working and they needed a way to get ahold of me. Pager code was a popular way of communicating (an art form in itself), and it birthed text messaging. People were finding new and easier ways to communicate, and today we can thank them for the innovations we have.

Why did I usually avoid these innovations? Mostly because I did not understand nor value them. Email was one of those innovations. Most people I knew did not have email, so why should I have one? Would it not be easier to pick up the phone and call them?

Today, I have more email addresses than I really want, and I would not know what to do if I did not have them. I find myself still avoiding trends that pop up mainly because I have not found the value that will benefit me and my time.

This year I got a Twitter account, but I was unsure on how to use it. I did not want to be like many who would broadcast every waking moment of their lives (simply because I did not care – example: what they were eating and what their stool looked like afterwards), so I decided to limit it to photography.

I first started searching for photographers who’s podcasts I followed. I would read their articles and thoughts, and if I thought they were good, I would retweet them. If they asked questions, I would try and participate. This is a great way to learn from the best and enter into their community.

The second thing I did was find a way to contribute to twitter. Many people tweet or retweet interesting articles, blogs, and tips, but I wanted to be original, not a Johnny-Come-Lately. I search articles (about 600-800) all day long for content that I am interested in, and what I think others would be interested in also. The title needs to catch my attention first before I read it, and if it is worthy I will tweet it.

My latest step is to create my own content. As I learn and participate, I find it easier to contribute. I do not want my feed to be The-Stool-Sampling-Broadcast, but I do want to have valuable news, tips, and information. And, hopefully I will find new innovations to avoid and talk about.